Regional Summits

Host a Regional Jack Summit in your community and change how whole regions think and talk about mental health!

Regional Jack Summits are youth led summits that inspire change and action at a local level. At a regional summit, young leaders from local schools or community groups get together to learn, share and work together to revolutionize mental health in their communities.

Our staff at Jack.org will work with you every step of the way to make sure your event is a success. By hosting a regional summit, you’ll provide a space for student leaders to become better equipped to lead mental health advocacy initiatives back in their communities. You’ll also build connections between teams, leading to unified efforts and a louder voice across whole regions.

Application Deadlines

To host a regional summit in winter 2018 (January - March), apply by October 31, 2017

To host a regional summit in spring 2018 (April - June), apply by January 31, 2018

To host a regional summit in fall 2018 (September - December), apply by June 30, 2018

Note: We recommend submitting your application at least 90 prior to your event to ensure a smooth planning process.

 

 

FAQs

What’s different this year?

After listening to all of the thoughtful feedback from last year’s regional summit hosts we’ve strengthened the program by creating a new, more robust planning guide with more resources, and by refining the planning process. We’re incredibly excited to continue supporting regional summits across Canada!

How do I host a regional summit?

If you’re interested in hosting a regional summit you’ll need to submit an application through our website. Once accepted, Jack.org will reach out to set up a welcome call with one of our summit coordinators, as well as provide you with our planning guide. The guide includes suggested timelines, planning phases, templates, and resources to help you plan for a successful regional summit. Throughout the planning process we’ll also always be available to help if you have any questions or need any support!

How are regional summit hosts chosen?

Regional summit hosts must be able to bring together groups of student leaders from multiple neighbouring schools or organizations, and be committed to mental health advocacy and student leadership to be considered.  

What are the summits all about?

Regional summits have two main components: youth skill building and collaboration. Skill building is often the first half of the day and can include speakers or workshops to strengthen student work. Topics often include mental health basics, effective social media use, starting conversations, and/or building a strong community back home.

 

Opportunities to collaborate make up the second half of the day. This often takes the form of structured brainstorm sessions or working groups where students from different schools discuss their varying school environments and learn from each other. Topics can include barriers to student help-seeking, stigma and school culture, tailoring to diverse population groups, and planning strategic outreach activities.

 
Can I get swag or funding for my regional summit?

Jack.org has a modest budget to help regional summit hosts with swag and select event costs. As you work through your planning phases, we’ll work with you to define your needs and help you in every way we can.

How can I be a delegate at a regional summit?

Since every regional summit reflects the needs of its community, delegate registration will look different at each event. If a school near you is hosting a regional summit and you’d like to attend, please contact summit@jack.org for information!

Testimonials:

“The students loved having the chance to connect with other young leaders and see what they’re up to. It made them feel like they are part of something bigger.”

“Jack.org’s support through the planning process was amazing! It really kept us on track and made running the summit so much easier.”

“It was such an amazing and enlightening experience … thank you for helping me find my voice and for giving me the opportunity to give others the chance to learn and speak up about mental health!”